Bee Cornee

I finished raking up pine needles this week.  I can not believe the warm temperatures.  I may not need the pine needles as mulch for several more weeks.

My neighbor also grows popcorn, and he stopped over Saturday to ask when I was planning to harvest.  We check in with each other around this time of year to talk popcorn.  I planned to harvest this weekend.  Everything looked nice and dry, no green cobs.  I had everything I needed to harvest.  Then I went to reach for the first cob, and all I saw was red.

This popcorn cob was eaten on the stalk
This popcorn cob was eaten on the stalk

The birds have been very busy.  They took at least three entire cobs.  I was pretty angry, mostly at myself for not getting to them sooner.  Fortunately, I have about 13 cobs drying.  The cobs need about a week to dry so the kernels are hard, no soggy popcorn.

Top Left - a cob just shucked; Top Right - close up of an ear still on the stalk; Bottom Left - half the cobs drying; Bottom Right - the other half drying
Top Left – a cob just shucked; Top Right – close up of an ear still on the stalk; Bottom Left – half the cobs drying; Bottom Right – the other half drying

After the cobs dry out. I work the kernels off the cob and store the kernels in quart mason jars.

Out of the corner of my eye I noticed a glimpse of red while carrying popcorn ears to the harvest basket.  Upon further investigation I found a very nice looking red pepper.

Another beautiful red pepper
Another beautiful red pepper

The green, and red, peppers have been excellent this year.  It is rare for me to be able to grow this many red peppers but with the mild temperatures it has allowed them to ripen to red.

Today I picked my first rutabaga.  I think my first year growing rutabagas has been successful.

First rutabaga the size of my hand
First rutabaga the size of my hand

Not only are the vegetables still doing well, I have a few flowers still in bloom.  On one of the cosmos flowers was a bee.

A bee working late into the evening
A bee working late into the evening

I am always happy to see pollinators working this late in the Fall.  When you are thinking about your garden next year think about how to feed pollinators in the Fall and early Spring.  Bees and other pollinators need food sources in those times when flowers are scarce.  Bees are a natural resource that is at risk, so please help them however you can.

Enjoy this season, learn from last season, and look forward to next season.

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3 thoughts on “Bee Cornee

  1. We planted oregano one year, which I sheepishly admit I hadn’t realized was a perennial (and a hardy one!) Local bees LOVE it. We’ve transplanted around the yard and enjoy watching happy bees at work (and wonder about the flavor of their honey). Also, your rutabaga is gorgeous! We use it in a family recipe affectionately called ‘garbage soup’.

    1. Thanks. Bees are disappearing at an alarming rate. We have no idea how much of our food depends on bees. Thanks for feeding them. I bet their honey would be nicely herby, if they get enough. I do love those experientail learning events, most of my learning comes from doing something and then learning. I would love to try your “garbage soup” recipe if your family is willing to share.

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