Tag: cauliflower

Transplanting is Transformational

The Micro Farm is a “buzz” with activity.

Pollinators are enjoying the black raspberry flowers
Pollinators are enjoying the black raspberry flowers

The strawberry patch is also producing lovely berries this year.  Such a nice crop mean I need to protect the ripe berries from animals nibbling.

The strawberries protected
The strawberries protected

I use a bird netting purchased at a local nursery.  It keeps most of the critters from eating the ripe fruit.

I spent a good deal of the week transplanting seedlings.  One evening while working on the Micro Farm.  I noticed small movements near my neighbor’s shed.  Sure enough two small rabbits.  I knew I needed to do something to protect my tender and young plants.  Fencing is what I needed, but I wanted to avoid the traditional woven metal fence.  A local home store had landscaping timbers on sale, decision made.

New "fencing"
New “fencing”

Hopefully this will keep the rabbits out.  We will have to wait and see.

I transplanted tomatoes, peppers, celery, cabbage, and cauliflower.

Cabbage transplants
Cabbage transplants
Cauliflower transplant
Cauliflower transplant
Tomato transplants
Tomato transplants

I also planted five pounds of seed potatoes, another 75 onion sets, beets, edamame,  popcorn, and carrots.

Growing greens has been a failure so far this season.  So I am tried putting some seed in six-packs to determine the quality of the seed.  The seed produced well.  I In another week I will put them into the ground.

Lettuce seedlings
Lettuce seedlings

As the rain falls tonight.  I am excited to see how the young plants spring to life over the next week.

Enjoy this season, learn from last season, and look forward to next season.

Suprises After the Weeds

I had not been in the garden in a few days.  Today I spent several hours working.  After pulling weeds, which I had not done in a long time, I was very encouraged.

One of three weed piles I pulled this week.
One of three weed piles I pulled this week.

Today I heard a speaker say that life is not about how I feel but what I “will” to do.  Gardening for me is a challenge.  Many times I do not “will” to go out and weed or do other work in around the Micro-Farm. This summer has been a particular challenge for me to keep up with what I should be doing.  One of my goals is to improve my succession gardening skills.  Every year I seem to struggle to plant my second crops at the correct time or to take care of them properly.  This year I planted several crops and most, if not all, had failed.  Reflecting back this was really discouraging.

Willing myself out today.  I pulled many weeds, which felt good. Pulling the weeds also revealed many young plants.

A few young onions
A few young onions
Young kohlbrobi, I think
Young kohlrobi, I think
Cauliflower, I think
Cauliflower, I think

I wish I had done a better job at record keeping.  I guess I will have to wait and see what comes of them.

So far the most successful second crop has been the rutabagas.  They are an heirloom variety that was typically planted on or around July 4th.  So far it has been good advice.

My largest rutabaga.
My largest rutabaga.

The peppers continue to be really successful this year.

A red sweet pepper
A red sweet pepper

After several hours of “willing” work my feelings cheered up.  What challenges or discourages you in the garden?  What encourages you in the garden?

Enjoy this season, learn from last season, and look forward to next season.

 

Late Summer Progress

No shortage of work to be done around the Micro-farm lately.  Most of the work has been cleaning and not related directly to growing food.  After all this non-garden work I am glad to be writing the blog again.

Popcorn
A few popcorn ears

The popcorn has tassled and most of the stalks have two ears on them.  I like the purple color on the tips of the silk.  It looks like another good year for popcorn.

One of three pumpkins
One of three pumpkins

After a couple of years of having to many pumpkins I only planted one or two plants this year.  Looking through the leaves today I saw three pumpkins.  They are good-sized.  I hope the pull through, the weather has been wet and damp lately.  Some of the leaves look like they have downy mildew on them.

Pumpkin leaves with downey mildew on them
Pumpkin leaves with downy mildew on them
The dry beans are mostly dry
The dry beans are mostly dry

As the dry beans continue to turn yellow I will pull out the plants by the roots then dry them on a screen.  After they are dried well, I will beat the plants against the screen to get the beans out.

The green pepper bulbs
The green pepper bulbs

I think this is the most successful year I have had growing peppers.  This year I was more disciplined in my plantings.  I planted fewer plants in each row than I have in the past.  I think I found the right ratio to space and plants.

Living and dying tomato vines
Living and dying tomato vines

A few weeks back I questioned if I should spray my tomatoes for late blight.  Well, many of the vines are dying.  They do not show signs of late blight on the fruit so I am wondering why they are dying.  Over the next day or so I will harvest all the fruit and place it in a cool place.  Those that are green hopefully, will ripen.

Over the past couple of weeks I also have done some planting.  I always plant something late in the season that I know that has little chance to finish before the frost.  A farmer friend offered me some free seedlings.  I planted some cabbage and broccoli.  I chose them because they were the most cold hardy and I thought they might have a chance.

Cabbage and broccoli seedlings.
Cabbage and broccoli seedlings.

The cauliflower, rutabaga, and kohlrobi are off to a poor start.  A few of the cauliflowers are doing well.  The rutabaga and kohlrobi are doing poorly, if they are growing at all.

A young cauliflower
A young cauliflower

I hope you are busy enjoying the bounty of your garden.

Enjoy this season, learn from last season, and look forward to next season.