Tag Archives: Tomato

Transplanting is Transformational

The Micro Farm is a “buzz” with activity.

Pollinators are enjoying the black raspberry flowers

Pollinators are enjoying the black raspberry flowers

The strawberry patch is also producing lovely berries this year.  Such a nice crop mean I need to protect the ripe berries from animals nibbling.

The strawberries protected

The strawberries protected

I use a bird netting purchased at a local nursery.  It keeps most of the critters from eating the ripe fruit.

I spent a good deal of the week transplanting seedlings.  One evening while working on the Micro Farm.  I noticed small movements near my neighbor’s shed.  Sure enough two small rabbits.  I knew I needed to do something to protect my tender and young plants.  Fencing is what I needed, but I wanted to avoid the traditional woven metal fence.  A local home store had landscaping timbers on sale, decision made.

New "fencing"

New “fencing”

Hopefully this will keep the rabbits out.  We will have to wait and see.

I transplanted tomatoes, peppers, celery, cabbage, and cauliflower.

Cabbage transplants

Cabbage transplants

Cauliflower transplant

Cauliflower transplant

Tomato transplants

Tomato transplants

I also planted five pounds of seed potatoes, another 75 onion sets, beets, edamame,  popcorn, and carrots.

Growing greens has been a failure so far this season.  So I am tried putting some seed in six-packs to determine the quality of the seed.  The seed produced well.  I In another week I will put them into the ground.

Lettuce seedlings

Lettuce seedlings

As the rain falls tonight.  I am excited to see how the young plants spring to life over the next week.

Enjoy this season, learn from last season, and look forward to next season.

True Leaves and Soil

The onion, tomato, and tomatillo seedling’s plastic was impeding growth so I removed it for good this week. It is exciting to see them progressing well.

Tomato seedlings

Tomato seedlings

Tomato seedlings.  You can see the "true leaf" starting to develop.

Tomato seedlings. You can see the “true leaf” starting to develop.

While taking pictures this evening I noticed there had been a small water accident and a number of my seed packets were wet.

Wet bottoms of my seed packets

Wet bottoms of my seed packets

Well, mistakes typically force us to create a better method.  I will have to work on developing a better storage plan.  I should be keeping seeds in a more water tight containers anyway.  So I will be thinking about how to do this efficiently and cost-effectively.

The weather has been difficult to work around.  On Friday morning I went cross-country skiing in my neighbor’s field.  By noon that same day most of my tracks had melted from snow to grass.  Looking back over four years of pictures about half the years I am working the soil, but this is not one of those years.  Until the soil thaws I will not be working the soil.  Walking on wet soil just compacts all the air pockets and makes it the harder for roots to push through the soil and for them to get the nutrients they are desire.

I did order another type of tomato seeds.  I have been growing Pruden’s Purple the past few years.  I like the tomatoes, and I find it is fairly disease resistant.  So they should be arriving soon, and I will get them started so they can be big and strong going into the soil.

I hope we will all be getting hands dirty soon.

Enjoy this season, learn from last season, and look forward to next season.